“Wearhouse: I’ve lived in cheep rent artist collective wearhouses most of my adult life, that’s around 17 years for anyone that’s counting

“Wearhouse: I’ve lived in cheep rent artist collective wearhouses most of my adult life, that’s around 17 years for anyone that’s counting. So much so, that my lack of rental history makes it difficult to rent “normal residences” I’ve worked odd jobs and done a lot of private contracting through out these years, which also adds to the difficulty in “lease holding”—–one can get caught in a loop, of renegade living quarters, weather it’s a conversion warehouse, or 9 people living in lofts in a 4 bedroom victorian, the conditions are frequently not ideal, not the things wishes and dreams are made of, not “safe”. An over filled and over populated residential is just as hazardous as a overfilled and overpopulated commercial space.
•THIS IS A CLASS WAR•
This is a Much larger systemic problem then code violations and fire safety equipment, this is about poverty and underclass. The looming eviction of what could be Thousands of wearhouse dwellers is deplorable, knee jerk and lazy, everyone isn’t just going to scuttle off and begrudgingly rent that over priced Studio apartment they have been “Rebeling against” all this time, or suddenly realize they are “ready for homeownership”.. No, there is already a housing crisis in most of the city’s where this class cleansing will occur. Like me, not everyone will be able to just go out and rent a place, weather it’s “rental history” “employment gaps” “bad credit/or lack of credit” or just plain “UN-affordability” this is a Broken System.
Whatever the answer may be, it will have to be Revolutionary, this isn’t just my Artist and Weirdo community, this is about poverty and class and how this Country miss handles it. This problem will only be fixed by Changing the System.”
- Erin Thirteenn Meyer

Cross-posted from Thinking Is Hard, an untitled book in progress:, If you picked up a book and saw this as the first sentence:, “There’s a single…

Cross-posted from Thinking Is Hard, an untitled book in progress:
If you picked up a book and saw this as the first sentence:
“There’s a single page on the internet that has found itself at the center of a strange and seemingly paradoxical vortex of confusion, frustration, and excitement.”
How likely would you be to read the 2nd sentence?
Which words resonate, and which turn you away?
(What if I wrote the whole book this way?)

Facebook wants to let you use your brain to control VR

Facebook wants to let you use your brain to control VR… and probably ways for VR to control your brain (but that’s for another post).
Facebook’s brainiac Regina Dugan is working on ways to control VR using only your mind. Dugan’s team has a theory that speech is a “compression” of the thought power of the brain.
She believes her team will be able to create technology that bypasses any need for the “compression” which would allow people’s brains to express themselves as naturally as possible.
Dugan is starting off with a goal of being able to type 100 words per minute using only your mind.

Tonight I’m interviewing two heroes of mine, and of nonfiction writing in general, on stage at the New York Public Library: Katherine Boo and Philip…

Tonight I’m interviewing two heroes of mine, and of nonfiction writing in general, on stage at the New York Public Library: Katherine Boo and Philip Gourevitch. We will talk about what it means to be an enemy of the people, a.k.a. a journalist, in an era defined by a president who is part-authoritarian, part-child, and fully a danger to the liberal constitutional order of the United States. Do join us.

Friends — This is going to be a fabulous event at the New York Public Library, and I invite you all to join us

Friends — This is going to be a fabulous event at the New York Public Library, and I invite you all to join us. It’s free! I will be in conversation with two heroes of mine and lions of narrative nonfiction: Katherine Boo (“Behind the Beautiful Forevers”) and Philip Gourevitch (“We Wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda”). If I get past security, the three of us will be discussing what it means to be an enemy of the people — or “journalist,” as it used to be called — in the age of Trump.

“It’s hard to find words

“It’s hard to find words. I have played in so many spaces with precarious floors and beams and stairs and not enough exits and certainly no sprinklers. Warehouses, squats, basements, rooftops, barns. Playing music saves my life. People tell me listening to music saves their lives. People telling me that my music saved their life saves my life even more. And we take the risks. Playing and listening in unsafe spaces. Because when we feel like we are dying anyway the risks don’t seem as risky as the risks we already face every day. The risk of self destructing. There aren’t enough places for us to gather. Our favorite places get turned into parking lots. So many clubs with their overhead and their staffs and their contracts and their lack of inclusivity and lack of tolerance and their age restrictions and their bars and their bigots. Those spaces are also unsafe just in different ways. Those spaces break you if you don’t make em the money. Because it’s always about the money. The fucking money. They will make you feel like a failure. Like a piece of shit. But all we can do is art. So we meet underground. We lurk in the shadows. And there it isn’t about success or failure. We sing and scream and cry and laugh and dance and group hug like cinnamon rolls and tell each other to get home safe and stay safe and be careful because the world is scary and the world is risky. We know we have to take care of each other.
So we meet in warehouses. Where we can just love on each other and escape from all the scariness and sadness. We take care of each other in our unsafe spaces that can feel so much safer than your safest spaces.
Imagine you were on a sinking ship. And there is only one lifeboat. And someone screams that there is a chance the lifeboat might tip over.
You’ll take that chance.
If I hadn’t had people inviting me to their unconventional venues over the years I would have been dead a long long time ago.
We’re not trying to put each other in danger. We are trying to save each other’s lives. We love each other so much.
I love you all.”
#oaklandfire
- Kimya Dawson
*Please copy and paste this instead of clicking “share” if you want this powerful message to spread. All credit goes to Kimya Dawson not me*

I’m looking for examples of disagreements people have had recently, and what they were about

I’m looking for examples of disagreements people have had recently, and what they were about. Could be from work, or personal life, or family, or friends, or any other part of your life. Feel free to change names and details… I just want the topic of disagreement. Examples:
“Whether or not calling senators works.”
“Why one person does more than the other.”
“Which movie to watch.”
“Whether a specific bug is worth fixing.”
Et cetera. No disagreement is too big or too small!
Thanks!

Friends, associates, former enemies, current enemies, acquaintances, strangers: Would you please join me and this fabulous group of writers and…

Friends, associates, former enemies, current enemies, acquaintances, strangers: Would you please join me and this fabulous group of writers and musicians for a night of performances about what America is and means. This Thursday, at Webster Hall, for some very good causes. If you love Donald Trump, show your support for him by not attending this event. Everyone else: You know what to do.

“Magic Hour (Epitaph for Family)” is currently on view at the Oakland Museum of California (OMCA)

“Magic Hour (Epitaph for Family)” is currently on view at the Oakland Museum of California (OMCA). It will be up until August 13th. If you weren’t able to see this piece at Human Resources Los Angeles, or would like to see it again/ in a new iteration and happen to be in the bay, here’s your chance. I would especially love for all my San Francisco Art Institute students to go check it out.
“Magic Hour (Epitaph for Family)” is a multi-channel video installation of the sea’s horizon before sunrise and after sunset, framing artists and activists Dean Spade, Julie Tolentino, Taisha Paggett, Calvin B Spade, Rachel Carns, Samuel White, Don Romesburg and Asha Romesburg sitting at their tables at home discussing and listening to the complexities about love, kinship, loss, and queer family making. Accompanying texts by Maggie Nelson, Malene Dam and Don Romesburg. Curated by Christina Linden.

I hate when people try to package white supremacy as “working class resentment”, Working class resentment ( the belief that you are being cheated…

I hate when people try to package white supremacy as “working class resentment”
Working class resentment ( the belief that you are being cheated cause you are a worker) can lead to the overthrow of capitalism.
White resentment (the belief that you are being cheated cause you are white) leads to the formation of lynch mobs.